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Climate Justice and Environmentalism

No, I’m not a militant vegan. Yes, I do reduce my meat consumption.

Climate Justice and Environmentalism, Food Producing Animals, Home cooking By February 22, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , No Comments
Here's last nights puritanical, militant vegan dinner. (Insert sarcastic eye roll here) Notice how there's more vegetables than meat on this plate? That must make me a commie vegetarian. We splurged on steak last night, something we don't do often, for both environmental and financial reasons. It was on sale.

Here’s last nights puritanical, militant vegan dinner. (Insert sarcastic eye roll here) Notice how there’s more vegetables than meat on this plate? That must make me a commie vegetarian.
We splurged on steak last night, something we don’t do often, for both environmental and financial reasons. It was on sale.

When I was 20 years old, I was deployed to Guantanamo Bay in the Army. One night we went out for dinner to celebrate the birthday of a person in our unit. There are a few restaurants in GTMO, and we went to one of the fanciest, the one attached to the Officer’s Club. It was pretty lush compared to the chow hall fare I ate for most meals, so I decided to go all out and order filet mignon, just how I like it, rare. Everyone at the table gasped in surprise. “I thought you were a vegetarian!” one of my fellow Soldiers exclaimed.

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Climate friendly diet: How and why we prioritize our dietary choices

Climate Justice and Environmentalism, Home cooking By February 17, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , , , 7 Comments

If you are concerned with how your diet impacts the environment, there are a lot of things you can do to have a more climate friendly diet. Most of these things are also good for your health, and believe it or not, many of them will actually save you money. Here is a list of what we do to prioritize eating sustainably, in order of most important to least. You might not be able to do it all, but you can do what you can in the moment. This isn’t an all or nothing thing. Everything helps. Reject AllOrNothingism in your dietary choices.

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Beyond Bikes and Busses, Part 1: Mass Transit

Climate Justice and Environmentalism, Community, Social Justice By February 15, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , No Comments
Beyond Bikes and Busses: Mass Transit - exploring transportation options beyond car culture

A map of the expanding mass transit system in Denver, making low cost, efficient, and low carbon transportation more accessible to more people. #transportationjustice #masstransit #climatejustice Image obtained here

This is part four in a series I’m running about car culture. If you would like, feel free to read part one, part two, and part three, which make the case for why we should move away from car culture and discuss what barriers prevent us from doing so. Subscribe and you’ll be notified by email when the rest of the posts in the series are published, as well as other cool posts about urban homesteading, environmentalism, and feminism!

I’ve been putting a lot of thought into how I would proceed from where I’ve left off with this series. I’ve made the case that a transportation culture built around cars is not pleasant or good for us and that we should be eager to do away with it, and I’ve also laid out a few of the reasons why doing so is unlikely under current conditions. Now I want to discuss the alternatives to cars that we have available right now or expect to have available in the near future, which will then lead us into a discussion of what kind of changes need to be made to make all of these options more practical and viable for daily transportation (that will be the next post in this series). Because this post would otherwise be very, very long, I’m going to break it down into three separate posts, so this series is going to be quite a bit longer than expected. I think it will be worth it, though, because otherwise this one post will be a monster. I’ve been working on it for a month.

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Our food system probably needs animal inputs

Climate Justice and Environmentalism, Food Producing Animals By February 3, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 4 Comments
15 things I've learned raising coturnix quail for eggs

Quail provide nitrogen to our gardens here at the Rocking Homestead.

In general, there’s an AllOrNothism idea out there that if conventional animal production produces greenhouse gasses, then all animal husbandry should cease immediately. I respectfully disagree. I understand and respect the choice to eliminate some or all animal products from your diet on moral grounds about the rights of animals or the ethics of killing, although I don’t share the same moral concerns myself. But I am skeptical that we can make any kind of food system that’s intended to feed any kind of industrialized society work without any animal inputs at all.

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Poverty fetish: Pros and cons of trendy simplicity

Climate Justice and Environmentalism, Community, Social Justice By February 1, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , No Comments

I recently read this article about poverty appropriation, and it brought up a lot of feelings in me about the rise of trendy simplicity. I grew up fairly poor. Not super poor, probably on the richer end of poor, always hovering just around the poverty line. We also lived in fairly wealthy neighborhoods. My mom worked her ass off (often in multiple jobs) to keep us living in those parts of town, even though we could have likely afforded much more in other parts of town, because the schools were better in the wealthier ends of town, and probably because of some sort of internalized classism my mom felt. Because of this, I always felt I was in some uncomfortable middle area between the middle and lower classes. I was definitely dramatically poor at home, and did not fit in with peers, but in other parts of my city, I felt like the bougiest poser on earth. To this day, I have weird class issues, many of which have only been exacerbated by having married into a more middle class family.

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How To Be Alive: RTH Book Club Selection January 2016

Activism, Book Club, Climate Justice and Environmentalism, Community, Parenting, Social Justice By January 30, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , No Comments

A quote from How To Be Alive, by Colin Beavan.

A quote from How To Be Alive, by Colin Beavan.

Our first ever book club! Woo! How did we do? The selection for this month was Colin Beavan’s latest book, How to Be Alive: A Guide to the Kind of Happiness that Helps the World. I chose this book for a number of reasons, not the least of which was the fact that I was a huge fan of Beavan’s last project and book, No Impact Man. I discovered his No Impact Man blog when I was pregnant with Elijah, and it launched me down a new road in environmentalism. I was especially drawn to his ideas about what really brings happiness in life, so when I heard he was writing an entire book devoted to that subject, I was pretty stoked.

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Start a revolt against AllOrNothingism

Activism, Climate Justice and Environmentalism By January 25, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , 3 Comments

AllOrNothingism is a plague on social progress and should be revolted against.

There is a problem in our culture. I have noticed it more times than I can count over the course of my adult life, and I despise it. It’s something I’ve come to refer to as AllOrNothingism. Its the idea that if an action you are taking won’t do much, it is never worth doing. If you can’t do something all the way, then you shouldn’t bother doing it at all. I want to call bullshit on this idea right away.

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Transportation equity: moving from car culture to more just transportation

Climate Justice and Environmentalism, Social Justice By January 4, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , 1 Comment

This is part three in a series we’re running about cars and the transportation system. Here’s part one, Cars suck! 11 reasons why, and part two, Cars suck! But we can’t live without them. Subscribe to be notified when the rest in the series are published!

We’ve talked about why cars suck and why we’re compelled to own them anyway, but I would be majorly failing if I didn’t acknowledge that some people still don’t have access to cars. As much as cars are a lousy burden, they are also a privilege, and a pretty crucial one in a society that is so dependent on cars.

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Rocking Homestead year in review – 2015

Activism, Community, Family Life By December 31, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , No Comments

This year has been a big year for everyone here on the Rocking Homestead. There have been some ups and downs, mostly ups, and some big, life altering moments and decisions.

The biggest things that happened this year was most likely the birth of my surro baby, Kennan, the fact that I’ve completed most of my degree program, and we made the decision to remain living in this house, possibly forever.

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Activism vs. Personal Action: The most important thing you can do to combat climate change

Activism, Climate Justice and Environmentalism, Social Justice By December 14, 2015 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , 2 Comments

I have been thinking about the best way to write this for months, there are probably a good 5 half finished blog posts dedicated to this subject in my drafts folder.  I’ve decided not to get flowery or mince words.  I’m about to make the case that activism is the most important thing you can do to fight climate change, and that personal action is good, but just not enough.

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