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city planning

Beyond Bikes and Busses, Part 1: Mass Transit

Climate Justice and Environmentalism, Community, Social Justice By February 15, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , No Comments
Beyond Bikes and Busses: Mass Transit - exploring transportation options beyond car culture

A map of the expanding mass transit system in Denver, making low cost, efficient, and low carbon transportation more accessible to more people. #transportationjustice #masstransit #climatejustice Image obtained here

This is part four in a series I’m running about car culture. If you would like, feel free to read part one, part two, and part three, which make the case for why we should move away from car culture and discuss what barriers prevent us from doing so. Subscribe and you’ll be notified by email when the rest of the posts in the series are published, as well as other cool posts about urban homesteading, environmentalism, and feminism!

I’ve been putting a lot of thought into how I would proceed from where I’ve left off with this series. I’ve made the case that a transportation culture built around cars is not pleasant or good for us and that we should be eager to do away with it, and I’ve also laid out a few of the reasons why doing so is unlikely under current conditions.┬áNow I want to discuss the alternatives to cars that we have available right now or expect to have available in the near future, which will then lead us into a discussion of what kind of changes need to be made to make all of these options more practical and viable for daily transportation (that will be the next post in this series). Because this post would otherwise be very, very long, I’m going to break it down into three separate posts, so this series is going to be quite a bit longer than expected. I think it will be worth it, though, because otherwise this one post will be a monster. I’ve been working on it for a month.

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Interior design for function over form

Climate Justice and Environmentalism, Community, House keeping, Social Justice By July 22, 2014 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , No Comments
If I were to live in a tiny house, it would be a fancy one like this.  Picture obtained from http://tinyhousesmallspace.tumblr.com/

If I were to live in a tiny house, it would be a fancy one like this. Picture obtained from http://tinyhousesmallspace.tumblr.com/

Lately, I have been reading about tiny houses and dense living conditions. Living in a tiny house has a lot of benefits, both personally and environmentally. The smaller your house, the less you spend to heat and cool it, the less you spend on utilities, the less crap you tend to accumulate. Smaller houses are cheaper, and use fewer resources both in building and maintaining. It also frees up more space in your yard, you get more yard out of a smaller property if your house is taking up minimal space.

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Can urban homesteading feed the world ?

Climate Justice and Environmentalism, DIY, Food Producing Animals, Gardening, Home cooking, Social Justice By May 19, 2014 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , No Comments

Recently I read this article at Grist and while I liked some parts, I disagreed with much. It argued that urban farms and homesteading were unlikely to do much in the quest to feed an ever growing, ever urbanizing, ever globalizing population, but it might provide some kind of educational benefit or something. Their arguments make sense, if you go into it assuming that everything else they talk about is the right way for things to be. Personally, all I could take away from it is that they were focusing on the wrong problems. This is why intersectionality in environmentalism is so important.

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